8.2.15

Animal Derived Ingredients in Natural & Organic Skincare


Animal Derived Ingredients in Natural & Organic Skincare
May I just add that this article is about MY opinions on certain ingredients, you may or may not agree with me but please respect my right to express my viewpoint. I want readers to gain an understanding of why I chose some brands over others. 

Last year I wrote a post (link) which caused a mix of outrage and support but there was a part of that article that I feel is worth re-addressing. I raised the question about buying from companies which have majority “clean” products but the occasional rouge one in the mix. I wanted to expand my viewpoint beyond the “good” and “bad” ingredients and turn it around to animal cruelty. 

My views on testing on animals were formed from an early age. I was ingredient aware as a teenager. I made decisions about what I would not eat and where I bought my products. This has stood the test of time and now expands into the world of “toxic” ingredients. Thankfully, there have been changes in animal testing laws but there are still loopholes. For example, it always amazes me how carmine is an acceptable ingredient for a company which promotes itself as cruelty free.

I have been contacted by brands that use Emu Oil, Lanolin, and Carmine in some their products and I made the decision to walk away from agreeing to review. I am not happy to promote one or two items which meet my standards but know that other products in the line contain ingredient which I believe are not cruelty free. Emu oil and Lanolin are by-products of the meat industry and as a non meat eater I feel it would be a double standard for me to support their use in skincare. I object to animal derived ingredients which lead to the death of an animal in the process of harvesting (e.g. Silk, Shellac, Bee Venom). I personally don't understand why people will purchase other products in a range but object to the cruelty of one ingredient. I am of the attitude that I would rather boycott by not purchasing and campaign for changes. I've had people argue boycotting only limits their choices further, it’s true but I am of the opinion that you are never going to change a company’s ingredients list if you continue to line their pockets with profits. 

It’s a tough campaign to change people’s opinions but when there is a world of plant alternatives why do we need to kill animals for our own vanity? I suspect when it comes to by-products of the meat industry, some will argue that at least nothing is wasted after the animal’s death. I can’t stop the world eating meat but I can ask those who have opinions about animal cruelty to consider the bigger picture about every purchase made.



Follow me on

10 comments:

  1. Great post Sarah :-) I also no longer buy from companies that supply products with Lanolin, Shellac or Emu Oil etc. For example, I'm now, no longer buying from Weleda. I find it insulting that they market a product like Skin Food (which contains Lanolin), as suitable for vegetarians!

    In terms of carmine, this is something I'm working/leaning towards. I recently did a review on the Lily Lolo mascara which I did really like, however, something happened the other day which is making me doubt the quality/longevity of the product and I believe I shall be updating my review. The only other product I use from them is the foundation, which although great, I believe would be easy to replace. Therefore, I no longer feel that there is anything stopping me from boycotting.

    I saw your tweet the other day about compiling a list of vegan skincare brands... I'm really excited to peruse this! I'm actually working on a similar thing, in regards to vegan makeup products.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment Katie, yes I too have issues with Weleda skin food, I agree with you. I do find that the line for Vegetarian suitability is often becoming a little blurred. I have strong opinions about Lily Lolo's marketing, I'm not happy with the use of carmine and yet they are marketing cruelty free. The vegan list is a work in progress but I'm working on it, I was surprised how many I already knew but I was hoping to discover more to increase the list :)

      Delete
  2. Sarah.. you do love to cause a stir don't you ;-)
    I will say something upfront that I hope you don't take the wrong way as you've said it yourself in not so many words - you are not a make-up junkie, you don't obsess over the beautiful colours in the pan and the gorgeous packaging, you don't relish the process of applying and wearing make up... so perhaps it is a bit easier for you to be selective about what you buy because you are not lusting over things in the same way some of us others do. If I refused to buy anything from a brand that used Carmine in their other products I would have very limited options. It's not the same but imagine you couldn't buy food from a shop that stocks meat... you would not have many options at all would you!?
    Also, on a practical note I do NOT have time to check every ingredient of a brand before I buy one item, checking that one item is sometimes more faff than I can be bothered with!! lol.
    One thing I will point out is that we raised the issue with Lily Lolo about Carmine in their products and all new products they have released since have been Carmine free. They have also listed Carmine clearer on their website (name as well as index number). No, they haven't changed the existing products that contain the offending ingredient but hopefully they will move towards that soon. We still have power as consumers and bloggers, and boycotting is not the only way although I agree it is an effective way.
    I generally buy from brands like Silk Naturals, Brija Cosmetics and Red Apple Lipstick and they are all vegan friendly lines BUT they are all from America, there is not much (if any) choice in the UK.
    Any way... The long of short of it is I'd like to agree with you in principle but unfortunately it's just not practical, for me anyway.
    But, I've enjoyed reading your views and respect them :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The reason it's easy for me has nothing to do with lusting over products because I am a Vegetarian therefore I have a lifestyle which I have chosen to live by. If you have a strong belief in something you make the sacrifices necessary to follow those beliefs. I'm not a makeup junkie because of allergies but also because of the cruelty that has existed in the industry however when writing this blog post I had skincare in mind, I was once offered bath bombs containing carmine.

      Delete
  3. Is it weird that these posts are my favourite from you? Love a bit of controversy with my morning cup of tea! Well ok here I am a meat eater stuck in the middle, I make choices with my food based on my personal health but as i seek out meat from RSPCA approved farms, the same goes for beauty products, I would never knowingly use something tested on animals. Cruelty free standard at the moment only signifies whether or not smthg has been tested on animals, hence companies are not technically saying anything untrue even if they use certain animal derived ingredients. Personally emu oil makes me sad,
    And lanolin has never appealed as an ingredient moral issues asside. Now about carmine, I'm actually doing a post on a product that does contain it and by the time it's done hopefully my position on it will be clearer even to me. The thing is it makes me feel like a hypocrite, on the one hand if it was made from a blood of a rabbit or bumble bees or something I would be outraged, and would boycott the company without hesitation. On the other hand coachella cockroaches just don't get the sentiment from me, and yet to use them purely for vanity sake is just well doesn't quiet sit right with me. I guess I'm still processing and deciding where to go with this issue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your input Tamara. How we process our feelings is very much individual and I don't think you are alone in your thoughts about Carmine. I have seen from others that there is often little emotion with people and I assume because it's an insect we don't seem to connect in the same way as with other animals. I understand that but I can't help but feel sorry for the poor beetle.

      Delete
  4. A good article Sarah. Makes me think about methods and ingredients used for skincare and makeup products.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, I was hoping to get people thinking so I'm pleased to hear your feedback :)

      Delete
  5. An insightful and thought-provoking post, Sarah, thank you for sharing. Overall, I am more conscious about what I use, eat and wear, but of course it's a work in progress. I'd be lying if I said that all my lipisticks are Carmine-free. I just wish there was less confusion around the terms "cruelty free", "vegan", "suitable for vegan", "not tested on animals" etc. Some companies definitely play on words and subsequently increase the confusion and misconception. I have a lot of respect for your work on that matter, you certainly contribute in providing the much-needed clarification around the use of animal-derivatives in beauty products :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comment Liz. I agree there is a lot of confusion over marketing terms, add "natural" and "organic" into that mix as well. I had an email yesterday that was a play on words, I spotted the products contained lanolin yet the sales pitch given was "since none of the ingredients are derived directly from animals, are suitable for vegetarians."

      Delete

Theme designed by Feeric Studios. Copyright © 2013. Powered by Blogger