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Why I choose not to use La Roche-Posay Lipikar

I will always be attracted to products that claim to help people manage skin conditions such as eczema. I received a free sample of La Roche-Posay Lipikar Baume AP and Lipikar Lait. This was something I had signed up for via the UK National Eczema Society. La Roche-Posay's Lipikar range is marketed to dry, itchy skin and "works in partnership with the skin to decrease the re-occurance of flare-ups in eczema-prone skin". Also free from soap and parabens. They also like to push that they have dermatologist approval.

The biggest hurdle that brands and customers face is that when it comes to eczema prone skin we all have different needs. There will always be products that work for me and not for others. As I have Atopic eczema it's connected to allergies so I scrutinise labels and I'm on the hunt for any ingredient that may trigger a reaction. I'm also looking to treat the itch and soothe overall appearance of my skin condition.

I'm personally disappointed in some of the ingredients in the La Roche-Posay Baume AP and Lait. They contain parfum, paraffin, dimethicone and acetylated lanolin alcohol which are not very appealing to my skin and the plant derivatives are few - shea butter, bisabolol, rapeseed. I strongly believe that any product intended for sensitive or eczema prone skin should be free from perfume. Fragrance is a known trigger so much so that there are 26 fragrance allergens which must be labelled if present at a specific percentage in cosmetics.  Mineral oils (paraffin) and dimethicone are intended to coat the skin and to give product a silky 'slip' for ease of application. If you experience eczema with infection then these ingredient may trap germs in place and offer no healing properties. If you haven't tried it before may I suggest you buy a tub of shea butter and see how you get on, it will be fragrance free and without paraffin. 

If La Roche-Posay works for you then fantastic but I simply wish to demonstrate how I go about choosing products and accessing labels. Always patch test your skincare and in the long term if you can't see an improvement then move on to something else.

8 comments

  1. Thank you for the warning! I have psoriasis so I will be steering clear.

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  2. If you're interesting in ingredients, a great website to check out is.. http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/

    You can look up products! :)

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  3. @Staci glad to be of help its my personal belief that skin conditions like yours and mine need natural TLC.

    @Vintage Makeup thanks you for the website link, very helpful

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  4. I have just started a blog on science communication sciencesosexy.blogspot.com. Maybe you'd like to guest post on your knowledge of skin products? I think it would be a great addition. Let me know if you're interested. I am your enwest follower, hopping from BSN x

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  5. @Esmeralda thanks for following, your blog looks very interesting

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  6. I think it is great that your blog is dedicated to chemical free products. I have tested & currently testing a few products for sensitive skin, so hopefully it will help you :) x

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  7. That's scary that they use those ingredients to treat skin conditions like Eczema, even if they are paraben free, I don't understand how parrafin is meant to do anything good for your skin. I think companies just use it as a cheap filler. I agree that natural products are probably best when it comes to skin conditions.

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  8. @MissTeaAddict - I totally agree with your comment, I never have understood the use of paraffin once I realised what is was and how it effects the skin.

    @Kia - thank you, its something I strongly believe in and wanted to tell the world. I look forward to reading about the products you are testing

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